OBITUARY TO REV TIM VAKOC

OBITUARY TO REV TIM VAKOC

Sourced from the following web Site: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/elpasotimes/obituary.aspx?n=tim-vakoc&pid=128778875

Tags: Tim Vakoc, heroes, peace, Iraq AP

ST. PAUL, Minn. (AP) – The Rev. Tim Vakoc, a Minnesota priest who was gravely wounded by a roadside bomb in Iraq five years ago, has died, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of St. Paul and Minneapolis said Sunday. He was 49.

Vakoc, who was believed to be the first military chaplain wounded in Iraq, died at a nursing home in suburban New Hope on Saturday. The cause of death was not immediately released.

Vakoc was an Army chaplain on May 29, 2004, when the blast cost him an eye and severely damaged his brain as he was returning from celebrating Mass with troops near Mosul.

“A man of peace, he chose to endure the horror of war in order to bring the peace of Christ to America’s fighting men and women,” Archbishop John Nienstedt said in a statement. “He has been an inspiration to us all and we will miss him. We ask everyone to remember him in prayer.”

The major was hospitalized for four months at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center in Washingt on, and was transferred in a near coma to the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in Minneapolis in October 2004.

After many surgeries and infections, he slowly started to recognize friends and family, and began to communicate with squeezes of the hand or slight smiles. In the fall of 2006, he spoke for the first time in 21/2 years.

Vakoc, a Robbinsdale native, served as a parish priest before becoming an Army chaplain in 1996, and serving in Germany and Bosnia. He shipped out to Iraq shortly before his 44th birthday.

Copyright (c) 2009 The Associated Press

Sourced from  http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/elpasotimes/obituary.aspx?n=tim-vakoc&pid=128778875

*

While stationed in Bosnia, Father Vakoc told his sister,
“The safest place for me to be
is in the center of God’s will,
and if that is in the line of fire,
that is where I will be.”
Rev Tim Vakoc
Military chaplain;
Died June 20, 2009.

The Rev Tim Vakoc, a priest who was gravely wounded by a roadside bomb in Iraq five years ago, has died, aged 49.
Vakoc was believed to be the first US military chaplain wounded in Iraq. He was on duty as an army chaplain in May 2004 when a blast cost him an eye and damaged his brain as he was returning from celebrating Mass with troops near Mosul.
“A man of peace, he chose to endure the horror of war in order to bring the peace of Christ to America’s fighting men and women,” Archbishop John Nienstedt said. “He has been an inspiration to us all and we will miss him.”

The major was in hospital for four months at the Walter Reed Army Medical Centre in Washington, and was transferred in a near coma to the Veterans’ Affairs Medical Centre in Minneapolis in October 2004.
After many surgeries and infections, he slowly started to recognise family and friends, and began to communicate with squeezes of the hand or slight smiles. In the autumn of 2006, he spoke for the first time in 30 months.
Vakoc served as a parish priest before becoming an army chaplain in 1996, serving in Germany and Bosnia.

“The just shall live by faith.”

Romans 1:17

Advertisements

Tags: , , ,

2 Responses to “OBITUARY TO REV TIM VAKOC”

  1. Alecia Hendry Says:

    Heard about this site from my friend. He pointed me here and told me I’d find what I need. He was right! I got all the questions I had, answered. Didn’t even take long to find it. Love the fact that you made it so easy for people like me. More power

    Like

  2. Abram Puckhaber Says:

    Stumbled into this site by chance but I’m sure glad I clicked on that link. You definitely answered all the questions I’ve been dying to answer for some time now. Will definitely come back for more of this. Thank you so much

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: